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california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do with taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more itiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing measures that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the state budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is on the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those were to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader asure tat attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it sets up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buy insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insurance. >> woodruff: and just quickly what are the polls showing on those? do we know much about th
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this yearhat's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are re
carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he is someone who
. as you can see from some of these maps, they showed california as an island and it took a long time for that to actually get removed from the maps-- old maps, it often took 100 years, maybe 200 years. >> reporter: google and others can react more quickly because of all the input they get. thousands of times a day, people all over the world tell google, via the internet, that roads, or signage, or stores or parks have changed, or that a their own neighborhood is poorly represented and that the company needs to update its maps. google investigates the alleged errors, and tries to correct them. the concept of having people on the ground change the map is called crowd sourcing. and it's the principle pioneered by an israeli-based mapping company called waze. that firm, with a small palo alto office, uses g.p.s. to track the location of 27 million drivers who have downloaded its app. waze depends on that crowd to update its maps, determine traffic congestion and direct users to alternate routes. >> so while you're getting a free navigation service, you're also contributing to the communi
on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce after retiring. you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made officialnd photographs become available. here, in silence, are eight more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among others. thank you andood night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media acce
and in the midst of the california wildfires six years ago, for the first time you saw private firefighters showing up at people's homes, spraying tm with fire retardant, so when the fire came this mansion would be standing and the next one might burn to the ground. this is extraordinary because we would tend to think of fire fighting, this is definitely a public good and definitely something that people get equally and now we're finding that even -- there's even a two-tiering of protection from wildfires. >> if there was even a short-lived airline in florida, i read about, that offered five-star evacuation service in the events of hurricane. >> yea, after hurricane katrina a company in florida saw a market opportunity and they decided to offer a charter airline that would turn your hurricane into a luxury vacation. that was actually the slogan. they would let you know a hurricane was headed to your area. they would pick you up in a limousine and drive you to the airport and they would make you five-star hotel reservations at the destination of your choice. why does a hurricane have to be bad news,
areas. they were in illinois, california, and new england. those are all places ere the president did very well. i think that even though going into election day those were close races, but the undecideds were president obama voters. they also broke for the democratic congressional candidate. >> woodruff: in a way there was maybe coat tail as part of the president's race. >> in states where they weren't swing states the races were places where the president did well. i think democratic candidates benefited. >> woodruff: as you look at the country overall, nathan, is there a trend, is there a story to be told about who did a better job, which party or the other d a better job o targeting these races? >> i think some of it is geographic. you had democrats strengthening and dem trattic states and democratic regions such as new england where there's no longer, there's no house republicans in new england right now. >> woodruff: at all. at all. there's senator snow who is kind of holding down the fort there but... then you saw republicans strengthening their grip on the south. there were ke
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)